Using Powershell to generate eventviewer statistics and event exports

During FIM health checks we need to have a good overview of the event viewer on the FIM Servers.
In almost any case the event viewer is a good measure of the server’s health.

The more red and yellow you see, the more errors and warnings, the more work you’ll have to get your server in a healthy state.

First goal is to have a general temperature of the health.
Second goal is to have the details to fix the issues.

I’ve created a Powershell to analyse the event viewer logs.

Instead of posting the Powershell in this blog, I’ve published it on TechNet Gallery, over here:

There is a companion Wiki article with some guidance and configuration manual.

In short, the Powerscript below is a modular script that offers following functions:

  • display the event log properties
  • analyse number of events per category
  • analyse number of events per severity
  • overview of error events with source, severity and sample message
  • detailed list of last event per eventID

You can configure the script:

  • choice of event logs
  • history length (period of events to report on)
  • enable/disable logging
  • enable/disable result export to file


Before you start

  • validate your script execution policy
  • copy the script to a separate folder where you can execute the script
  • validate the script parameters

Script configuration parameters

  • $enableLogging
    • $TRUE = create a transcript of the script during run (does not work in ISE)
    • $FALSE = do not create a verbose log
  • $ExportEnabled
    • $FALSE = do not export the result to file
    • $TRUE = export the results, statistics and event details to file
  • $EventLogList
    • Default: ‘System’,’Application’,’Setup’,’Forefront Identity Manager’,’Forefront Identity Manager Management Agent’
  • $startdate
    • Defines from which point in time the event logs must be analysed
    • HINT: on a system with a large size of event logs, it’s advised to limit the history to x days or x weeks. A large volume event log will impact the usage of script memory.

I’m more than happy if you would test the script and provide me feedback to improve the script.


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