best practices

Security & Privacy Life Hack: advantages of a personal mail alias

Table of Contents

Introduction

You’ve probably got one or more personal and professional mail addresses. Who doesn’t?

And you probably want to keep that mail address safe from spammers, scammers or data theft.

Althoug you primarily use mail to communicate (send/receive messages), many platforms also use your mail address for authentication.

Security remark: It’s not always the best option to use single sign-on with platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, Microsoft Account, Google, …

What’s the security issue?

The main issue with single sign-on is: when your mail address is breached or hacked, the hacker can use the breached mailbox fairly easily to login to the linked platforms.

And from a practical point of view, if you use that single personal mail address to subscribe to newsletters or you use that mail address for downloads protected by a “registration” wall, you’ll quickly experience a mailbox overload because of ‘spam’, eh.. .sorry commercial messages you didn’t ask for.

Another issue is, you usually have only 1 (one) personal mail address available on your mail platform, certainly for enterprise systems, you can’t create other alternative mail addresses at free will. Unless you own the domain name, of course, but that’s rather possible for personal use or small companies…

And except for the mail overload, you’ll notice that many companies sell your mail address to address brokers. And even with the GDPR in place, many of these address brokers have bad habits to scrape mail addresses from the internet, incl. public sources, government sources…

So, the question is, how do you manage this, to protect your personal data, to protect mailbox overload and abuse of your mail address?

First option is using MFA to increase security and block illegal authentication.

But MFA does not stop mail abuse. The mail alias to the rescue!

Implementing the mail alias

What is a mail alias?

A mail alias is an alternative name for the master mailbox. Usually a mail alias is forwarding mail to the target mailbox.

In many cases, that mail alias can also be setup or used as a temporary name for the target mailbox. It’s pretty cumbersome or difficult to switch a master mailbox on or off when you need it.

Purchase a Custom domain name

The most interesting option is purchasing a custom domain name (by preference a short URL).

In most cases, local domain registrars can offer you a custom mail domain of choice for a few bucks a year. It’s worth the money, I promise. Further explanation below.

Just a practical hint: make sure to use a domain registrar that offers unlimited mail aliases.

When you control the mail domain, you can forward any mail alias of the custom domain to your mailbox (eg news@short.url to subscribe to newsletters and filter them in your mailbox in a subfolder for newsletters).

Furthermore, when you own a domain, you can enable/disable a mailbox or alias. Meaning: block mail reception without deleting the mail address (keep the address, but desactivate it.)

Using the “+” mail alias option

If purchasing a custom domain is not an option, you can check with your mail platform or mail administrator to use a “+” alias.

That’s format supported by the internet standards (RFC 5233: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5233), that allows to extend a master mail address with receiver suffixes (BEFORE the @ sign), that still deliver the mail to the receiver. Google calls it “task based” variations of the mail address.

You’ll generally find it back on the internet as “+” aliases (“plus” aliases).

Some examples:

See the references section at the end of the article, for details how this “+” alias works for the well known mail platforms… Google, Microsoft, … and the major free mail providers support the plus-alias.

Using dummy or temporary addresses against spam and registration walls

I don’t know how you do it, but it frequently happens that I need to download a “free” white paper, which only seems to be free if you ‘pay’ with your contact details.

In most of the cases, they force you to “consent” with the requirement to send you marketing,… in GDPR terms it’s not considered consent if it’s forced… But essentially they force you to submit your personal data.

If you don’t want to disclose your data, just for that single download, or … if you want to avoid getting too much spam, what do you do?

One-time use, temporary mail domains (not your own domain)

First and easy option is to search the internet for “temp mail”, “temporary mail addresses” or “disposable mail“, … synonyms for one time use mails.

You use these addresses for quick use, one shot hit.

Samples:

  • mailinator.com
  • temp-mail.org
  • guerillamail.com
  • mail.tm
  • many more…

Use your custom domain

An easier, but less free, but still cheap option, is to purchase your own custom domain (on the condition you can have multiple mailbox aliases).

The quick and dirty: create an alias like download@yourdomain.url, keep it disabled by default and only enable it when you need to receive a download link. Afterwards, disable it again.

In some cases you literally need to have a mail address just once. Eg, when you want to download a “free” white paper, many companies harvest your mail, put it in a CRM system and keep spamming you afterwards. It’s fairly difficult to escape the forced consent or registration.

Then you can use a temporary mail alias:

  1. you enable an alias or dummy address,
  2. register for the download with the alias/dummy,
  3. then disable the alternative mail address again.

That way the address cannot be harvested for spam or marketing you don’t need. Easy.

(When a address broker tries to use the disabled alias, they will get an NDR, non-delivery report, and delete the invalid mail registration from their farm…)

Advantages

Keep your inbox clean : Mail filtering using simple mail rules

One the most prominent advantages of using aliases is that most of the mail clients can use the receiver address (or alias) to filter and manage incoming mail.

Based on the target receiver alias, you can set simple rules to move incoming mail from your inbox to another folder.

Basically an mail alias offers a simple mailbox optimization technique to make your life easy.

Securing internet logins

Another major advantage of aliases: use it as an alternative identifier for single sign-on.

Instead of logging in to multiple platforms with the same mail address, you better use 1 unique alias address per platform.

For example:

Of course it’s quite important to use different passwords or authentication methods too (incl. MFA).

The main reasoning behind this approach is: if 1 login is breached or leaked, the other accounts are not impacted. If you don’t think you can manage this collection of passwords, there is one good tip: use a password manager to replace your memory.

Use a password manager anyway.

Detecting data breaches

When you use 1 mail address (alias) for every internet login, you can also trace very easily if a website is selling your data to partners, other companies or personal data brokers. You can simply see who sends mail, if that source domain is correctly linked to your alias… or not. If your login is used by unauthorized party you can initiate GDPR subject data access request to track how it got there (against both the original data controller and the secondary party).

And when using a custom domain (or some “+” alias mail providers), you can simple disable or remove the mail alias, so it becomes useless for the perpetrators.

On/Off Temporary mail (when using your custom domain)

In some cases you literally need to have a mail address just once. Eg, when you want to download a “free” white paper, many companies harvest your mail, put it in a CRM system and keep spamming you afterwards. It’s fairly difficult to escape the forced consent or registration.

When you can use a temporary mail, you enable an alias or dummy address, register for the download with the alias/dummy, then disable the alternative mail address again. That way the address cannot be used for spam or marketing you don’t want. Easy.

One-time use temporary mail domains

First and easy option is to search the internet for “temp mail” or “temporary mail addresses”

You use these addresses for quick use, one shot hit. No hassle, no admin. Quick and dirty.

Some more advantages

You can also link your custom domain to shortener tools like bit.ly. This way you can manage your social media and easily track your popularity or maintain statistics on your articles and views. (For Bitly, search for “bitly custom domain”)

Disadvantages

Custom domain management

Managing your own custom domain might be cumbersome, depending how user friendly the management of aliases is. Certainly managing dynamic aliases for multiple users… can time consuming. Certainly if you have a large volume of mailboxes and/or aliases to manage.

But managing a custom domain for own personal use, for a few bucks a year, is really worth the time and money. 

If you cannot disable “+” aliases …

… then you might be in trouble, because you cannot stop the abuse once the senders have registered the alias in their mail system.
In many cases, you’ll need to unsubscribe or directly contact the platform owner and demand to remove your data, which can be cumbersome or time consuming… Or you need to excercise your right to be forgotten in the official way. (Ref. GDPR, …)

Temporary mail domains blocked & open access

The major disadvantage is that a lot of spam (eh sorry), marketing websites that offer these ‘free’ downloads, will recognize and block public temporary mail domains (like mailinator, guerilla mail, temp mail, …).

In most cases you’ll have to try a few options, as some of these temporary mail domains have alternative mail domain options, like dynamic domains not only hosting main on the master domain.

VERY IMPORANT SECURITY NOTICE: whatever mailbox you use on these temporary domains, anyone can read or access these mailboxes, so make sure nothing important or private is sent to these mailboxes.

Bonus: the “oh shit rule”

While I’ve been focusing on the security & data protection features of the mail alias, I still want to mention an important principle to protect your reputation: the “oh shit rule”.

The principle is simple: delay the sent articles with one or more minutes before the mails are actually sent to the receiver.

It gives you a bit of slack if you want to fix a mail, or in worst case scenario cancel the mail if you have second thoughts or regret sending the mail, to avoid embarrassment or being forced to search for a new job.

Some useful references

Below you’ll find some interesting articles on managing aliases on the well-known mail providers

Gmail

Microsoft Office 365 “+” alias

Yahoo

Other providers

Other providers, like Protonmail, … also provide the alias “+” option, sometimes by default. Carefully check if you can remove the “+” alias or not, in case the alias got listed by address brokers.

Custom mail address RFC standard

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5233

BTW, did you know… that following the RFC standards, an email address is case sensitive. 😉

Hoe zit dat met data brokers, direct marketing en KBO. Is dat legaal? En is dat nu GDPR of niet? Hoe aanpakken?

Je kan dit document als PDF downloaden als je het offline wil lezen.

Overzichtstabel

  1. In het kort
  2. Publieke verplichting van de overheid om bedrijfsgegevens te publiceren
  3. Direct marketing
  4. Direct marketing met KBO data
  5. Nog andere spelregels van toepassing?
    • GDPR
  6. Wat is het GDPR probleem?
  7. Wat moet je dan WEL doen als data broker of direct marketing?
  8. Hoe kan je zelf misbruik tegengaan?
  9. Referentiemateriaal

1. In het kort

Sinds een aantal jaren (2003) heeft de overheid, met name de Federale Overheidsdienst (FOD) Economie, het bedrijvenregister gemoderniseerd en via KBO (Kruispuntbank Ondernemingen) op internet ter beschikking gesteld. Het is een publieke en wettelijke verplichting van de overheid om dat te doen.

Maar dat register bevat natuurlijk heel wat interssante data van bedrijven en hun verantwoordelijke personen.
Niet alleen om contractuele partijen te valideren… maar ook gebruiken heel wat commerciële bedrijven de collectie om die data door te verkopen in de vorm van adressenlijsten.

Er zijn een aantal spelregels die het gebruik van die data aan banden leggen en die je moet kennen, met name de Belgische wet op KBO, de gebruikerslicenties van KBO en … GDPR die belangrijke verplichtingen oplegt voor het hergebruik van publieke data.

Maar daar vegen heel veel data brokers en direct marketing bedrijven dus gewoon hun voeten aan.

Disclaimer: niet alle databrokers schenden de wet en gebruiken wel de juiste data, door persoonlijke gegevens te verwijderen uit hun data collectie. Maar dit is eerder uitzondering dan regel.

Dit artikel

  • geeft je wat meer achtergrond bij de spelregels,
  • legt uit wat er fout loopt en waar je moet op letten en
  • geeft je ook wat tips hoe je jezelf kan beschermen tegen deze praktijk.

Samenvatting

  • Direct marketing is elke communicatie, in welke vorm dan ook, gericht op de promotie of verkoop (m.u.v overheid)
  • De wet verbiedt om direct marketing te doen met alle KBO data
  • In geval van GDPR data zijn er nog bijkomende richtlijnen te volgen
  • Neem maatregelen tegen misbruik (verwijder overbodige data of gebruik specifiek mail adres)

2. Publieke verplichting van de overheid om bedrijfsgegevens te publiceren

De contactgegevens van de entiteiten die geregistreerd zijn bij de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen worden beschikbaar gesteld zowel via onze “public search” website als via webdiensten / hergebruikbestanden.

Dus de KBO Webdiensten omvatten ondermeer

Het ter beschikking stellen via de “public search” is in overeenstemming met artikel III.31 van het Wetboek van economisch recht en overeenkomstig artikel 1 van het koninklijk besluit van 28 maart 2014 tot uitvoering van artikel III.31 van het Wetboek van economisch recht inzonderheid de bepaling van de gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen die via internet toegankelijk zijn evenals de voorwaarden voor het raadplegen ervan.

Dit laatste bepaalt dus het volgende: « Artikel 1, §1. De volgende gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen zijn via het internet toegankelijk: 

  • 1° het ondernemingsnummer en het (de) vestigingseenheidsnummer(s);
  • 2° de benamingen van de onderneming en/of van haar vestigingseenheden;
  • 3° de adressen van de onderneming en/of van haar vestigingseenheden;
  • (…)
  • 10° de verwijzing naar de website van [1 de geregistreerde entiteit]1, haar telefoon- en faxnummer alsook haar e-mailadres.

Deze laatste (het mail adres) is natuurlijk cruciaal en zeer interessant voor direct marketing (of als je het spam wil noemen, ook goed).

Met betrekking tot het verstrekken van contactgegevens in het kader van webdiensten/ hergebruik-bestanden, stelt de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen, via het volledige bestand voor hergebruik van gegevens, een aantal gegevens ter beschikking. Tussen deze gegevens, zitten ook persoonsgegevens. Het gaat om het geheel van de informatie betreffende de entiteiten natuurlijk persoon alsook de namen en voornamen van de personen die, binnen rechtspersonen, functies uitoefenen of de ondernemersvaardigheden bewijzen.

Belangrijk om te weten is ook dat je als verantwoordelijke van een bedrijf ook “declaratieve”, bijkomende contact gegevens kan toevoegen (dus je mail adres).

Zelfs als je vrijwillig contact data in KBO ingeeft, blijven dat KBO bedrijfsgegevens, maar het kan dus ook persoonlijke data zijn (zoals je mail adres) zijn die onder GDPR valt.

Later in dit artikel lees je meer daarover.

Het verstrekken van contactgegevens in het kader van webdiensten / hergebruikbestanden gebeurt in overeenstemming met artikel III.33 van het Wetboek van economisch recht en het koninklijk besluit van 18 juli 2008 over het hergebruik van openbare gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen.

3. Direct marketing?

Voor we verder gaan wil ik toch even de interpretatie van “direct marketing” toelichten, want dat vind ik niet zelf uit. En ik wil ook vermijden dat er door de data brokers of de commerciële bedrijven zelf een twist aan gegeven wordt.

Bron: https://gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit.be/burger/thema-s/marketing/wat-is-direct-marketing

“De GBA stelt voor het begrip direct marketing als volgt te interpreteren:

elke communicatie, in welke vorm dan ook, gevraagd of ongevraagd, afkomstig van een organisatie of persoon en gericht op de promotie of verkoop van diensten, producten (al dan niet tegen betaling), alsmede merken of ideeën, geadresseerd door een organisatie of persoon die handelt in een commerciële of niet-commerciële context, die rechtstreeks gericht is aan een of meer natuurlijke personen in een privé- of professionele context en die de verwerking van persoonsgegevens met zich meebrengt.

Direct marketing omvat alle vormen van communicatie, ongeacht of deze gericht zijn op de promotie van goederen of diensten, de promotie van ideeën, voorgesteld of ondersteund door een persoon of organisatie, maar ook de promotie van die persoon of organisatie zelf, met inbegrip van zijn/haar merkimago of de merken die zijn/haar eigendom zijn of door hem/haar worden gebruikt, met uitzondering van de promotie die wordt uitgevoerd op initiatief van overheidsinstanties die strikt handelen in het kader van hun wettelijke verplichtingen of openbare dienstverleningstaken voor diensten waarvoor zij alleen verantwoordelijk zijn.

De berichten kunnen bijgevolg zowel uit de commerciële als de niet-commerciële sector komen, zoals de politieke sector of non-profitorganisaties.”

https://gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit.be/burger/thema-s/marketing/wat-is-direct-marketing

4. Direct marketing met KBO data

De bekendmaking van de contactgegevens is dus volledig in overeenstemming met de taken die de wetgever aan de KBO/FOD Economie heeft toevertrouwd. Voor de FOD Economie is de verwerking is dus rechtmatig in de zin van artikel 6 c) van de GDRR, aangezien die noodzakelijk is voor de naleving van een wettelijke verplichting waaraan de FOD Economie is onderworpen.

Voor het overige moet je weten dat het gebruik voor directmarketingdoeleinden van door de KBO ter beschikking gestelde persoonsgegevens verboden is.

Dit verbod komt zowel in artikel 2, §1 van bovenvermeld Koninklijk Besluit van 18 juli 2008 als in alle KBO hergebruikcontracten van de FOD Economie terug.

  Art. 2.§ 1. De openbare gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen kunnen overeenkomstig de nadere regels en de voorwaarden van dit besluit, door de beheersdienst doorgegeven worden aan derden met het oog op [1 …]1 hergebruik.
  Derden mogen evenwel geen persoonsgegevens voor direct marketingdoeleinden gebruiken en/of herverspreiden.

artikel 2, §1 van bovenvermeld Koninklijk Besluit van 18 juli 2008

Voor de hergebruik contracten, kan je de voorwaarden terugvinden in de privacy policy en de specifieke gebruiksovereenkomsten, zoals:

Die zeggen allemaal hetzelfde, conform de Belgische wet uiteraard:

“2.2 De licentienemer mag de persoonsgegevens niet gebruiken voor direct-marketing
doeleinden, in overeenstemming met artikel 2 van het koninklijk besluit van 18 juli 2008
betreffende het hergebruik van publieke gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van
Ondernemingen.”

Van: webservice-Public-Search-gebruiksvoorwaarden.pdf

5. Nog andere spelregels van toepassing?

De gegevens van de Kruispuntbank van Ondernemingen (KBO) zijn dus publiek, maar er is in de wet dus een uitdrukkelijk verbod om de gegevens te gebruiken voor direct marketing doeleinden.

Maar dat zijn niet alle regels die hier van toepassing zijn. Want ook GDPR is hier van toepassing, tenminste op de persoonsgegevens die in de bedrijfsdata zitten.

5.1. GDPR

Want GDPR definieert persoonsgegevens als data die een persoon (kunnen) identificeren, dus dat betekent ook dat een persoonlijk professioneel mail adres GDPR data is. Let op, niet alle data in KBO is GDPR data, want algemene bedrijfsdata valt buiten GDPR.

Waarom is de GDPR belangrijk hier?

Buiten het verbod op direct marketing, zeggen KBO en de Belgische wet NIKS over transparantie naar de betrokken bedrijven als je data kopieert uit KBO.

Dat is natuurlijk heel andere koek in GDPR, met name

  • Art.5 (Beginselen inzake verwerking van persoonsgegevens)
    • ze moeten “worden verwerkt op een wijze die ten aanzien van de betrokkene rechtmatig, behoorlijk en transparant is („rechtmatigheid, behoorlijkheid en transparantie”)”
  • Art 6 (Rechtmatigheid van de verwerking)
    • Dit is van belang als publieke data plots gebruikt wordt voor een ander doel, bijvoorbeeld commerciële adreslijsten
    • Verhouding tussen gerechtvaardigd belang en toestemming, “wanneer de belangen of de grondrechten en de fundamentele vrijheden van de betrokkene die tot bescherming van persoonsgegevens nopen, zwaarder wegen dan die belangen, met name wanneer de betrokkene een kind is.”
  • Art. 12: Transparantie voor toepassing van Art. 13 en 14.
  • Art. 13: “Te verstrekken informatie wanneer persoonsgegevens bij de betrokkene worden verzameld”
  • Art. 14: “Te verstrekken informatie wanneer de persoonsgegevens niet van de betrokkene zijn verkregen”

6. Wat is het GDPR probleem?

6.1 Overheid

Ook op vlak van GDPR heeft de overheid de verplichting om deze data te publiceren, in functie van hun publieke verantwoordelijkheid.

Dit valt onder GDPR artikel 6) 1.c (wettelijke verplichting) en nog belangrijker Art.6.1.e. “taak van algemeen belang of van een taak in het kader van de uitoefening van het openbaar gezag dat aan de verwerkingsverantwoordelijke is opgedragen”

En bij het opstarten van je bedrijf, bij registratie in KBO dus, krijg je de uitleg en de privacy policy van KBO vult de andere transparantieverplichtingen aan. Je hebt niet veel keuze, het is een publieke verplichting.

6.2 Data broker / direct marketing

Maar dat verandert dus helemaal als een data broker of een direct marketing je data van KBO steelt.

Wat moeten zij dan doen, als je het volgens de regels van GDPR speelt?

Algemene taak als verwerkingsverantwoordelijke

Eerst en vooral bij het copieren van KBO data, zeker voor het gebruik voor commerciele doeleinden, met name werven van klanten, gaat het dus bijna altijd om “direct marketing”.
Het kopieren en gebruiken van KBO data is illegaal door de Belgische wet, jammer maar helaas, dat heeft niks met GDPR te maken.

Je zou dus “gerechtvaardigd belang” kunnen inroepen, maar zelfs dan zijn er belangrijke voorwaarden aan verbonden. Dat leg ik straks uit onder de verplichting van art. 14.

Transparantie

GDPR Art. 12. 1

De verwerkingsverantwoordelijke neemt passende maatregelen opdat de betrokkene de in de artikelen 13 en 14 bedoelde informatie en de in de artikelen 15 tot en met 22 en artikel 34 bedoelde communicatie in verband met de verwerking in een beknopte, transparante, begrijpelijke en gemakkelijk toegankelijke vorm en in duidelijke en eenvoudige taal ontvangt,

Bepaling van DAR/SAR (subject data access request), Art. 12. 3

“De verwerkingsverantwoordelijke verstrekt de betrokkene onverwijld en in ieder geval binnen een maand na ontvangst van het verzoek krachtens de artikelen 15 tot en met 22 informatie over het gevolg dat aan het verzoek is gegeven.”

Eerste direct contact betrokken persoon (Art. 13)

Art.13 is van toepassing als je de gegevens direct van de betrokken persoon krijgt.

Indirect contact (Art. 14)

Volgens Art. 14 moet je de betrokken persoon verwittigen bij het verzamelen van de gegevens als ze niet rechtstreeks van de betrokken persoon komen en de nodige details bezorgen, inclusief

  • wanneer de gegevens verkregen zijn
  • doeleinde verwerking;
  • de ontvangers (dus de marketing bedrijven, in dit geval)
  • hoelang de gevens opgeslagen worden;
  • gerechtvaardigde belangen;
  • de bron. (“Art. 14 §2.f de bron waar de persoonsgegevens vandaan komen, en in voorkomend geval, of zij afkomstig zijn van openbare bronnen;”)
  • en nog andere info…

En nog veel belangrijker volgens Art. 14 §3, moet de betrokken persoon moet daarvan verwittigd worden, ik citeer : “

  • a) binnen een redelijke termijn, maar uiterlijk binnen één maand na de verkrijging van de persoonsgegevens, afhankelijk van de concrete omstandigheden waarin de persoonsgegevens worden verwerkt;
  1. b) indien de persoonsgegevens zullen worden gebruikt voor communicatie met de betrokkene, uiterlijk op het moment van het eerste contact met de betrokkene; of
  2. c) indien verstrekking van de gegevens aan een andere ontvanger wordt overwogen, uiterlijk op het tijdstip waarop de persoonsgegevens voor het eerst worden verstrekt.

En net daar gaan HEEL VEEL data brokers en direct-marketing bedrijven NOG EENS in de fout, geen transparantie, geen bronvermelding, geen details van collectie, … Een simpele vermelding in de “privacy policy” is niet voldoende…

7. Wat moet je dan WEL doen als data broker of direct marketing?

Enkele tips

  • Zorg dat je een heel duidelijke en expliciete privacy en data protection policy hebt, die publiek beschikbaar is en goed leesbaar.
  • Gebruik GEEN KBO data.
    • Dat is illegaal. Heeft niks met GDPR te maken, geen direct marketing met KBO data volgens de wet.
  • Contacteer het prospectbedrijf via de algemene contact gegevens, via hun website, … via andere kanalen.
  • Bij gebruik van algemene bedrijfsgegevens (algemeen telefoon nummer, info@bedrijf.url…) dan is GDPR niet van toepassing.
  • Als je gegevens van persoon, de bedrijfsverantwoordelijke zélf ontvangt
    • Pas Art.12 -, 13 en 14 toe
    • Wees transparant, vertel waar de gegevens vandaan komen
    • Vraag bij eerste contact om toestemming, of regel een andere wettelijke grond die stand houdt.
    • Bij weigering of intrekken toestemming, verwijder data onmiddellijk, tenzij andere redenen van toepassing zijn.
  • Als je contact gegevens verzamelt uit andere bronnen dan de persoon zelf,
    • VERWIJDER ALLE PERSOONLIJKE DATA, dan is het géén GDPR data.
    • Pas Art.12, 13 en 14 toe
    • Wees transparant, vertel waar de gegevens vandaan komen
    • Vraag bij eerste contact om toestemming
    • Bij weigering, verwijder de data onmiddellijk
  • Onderhoud je data op regelmatige tijdstippen, vb check met de contactpersoon minstens 1x per jaar dat de data nog up to date is, bij weigering of gebrek aan antwoord: wis de data
  • Beperk de data opslag tot redelijke bruikbare termijn, dat is een paar jaar. GEEN 15 jaar, zoals sommige data brokers doen. Email adressen zijn na een paar jaar niet meer vers. Er verandert vrij veel in de contact gegevens.

7. Hoe kan je zelf misbruik tegen gaan?

Dit heb ik in het kort uitgelegd in dit LinkedIn artikel: Data Protection Life Hack: stop de direct-marketing spam met je KBO data.

7.1 Proactief/preventief

Verwijder je declaratieve gegevens uit KBO

Voor de details zie: Data Protection Life Hack: stop de direct-marketing spam met je KBO data.

Declaratieve gegevens zijn optioneel, en niet strikt noodzakelijk voor de werking van KBO.
Maar het kan om bepaalde redenen toch wel handig zijn…

Zorg dat je KBO-gegevens als persoonsgegevens onder GDPR vallen

Gebruik geen algemeen mail adres. Maak het persoonlijk, dan kan je de rechten onder GDPR afdwingen.

Let op: Bij gebruik van algemene bedrijfsgegevens (algemeen telefoon nummer, info@bedrijf.url…) dan is GDPR niet van toepassing.

Natuurlijk als je graag marketing ontvangt of het nodig hebt, dan is deze discussie niet zo belangrijk.

TIP: gebruik een alias zoals uitgelegd in het LinkedIN article, zodat je je mailbox netjes kan houden.

7.2 Reactief

Als je ondanks de voorzorgen TOCH spam krijgt, die je niet wil ontvangen, kan je actie ondernemen.
Hou er rekening mee dat dit vaak tijd neemt en soms een lastige administratieve route is.

Mogelijke acties

Dus, dan zijn er een aantal mogelijke opties (- eenvoudig, +/- vergt wat werk, ++ moeilijk)

  • (-) Dien een subject data acces request (DAR/SAR) in bij het direct marketing bedrijf dat je contacteert, zodat je weet
    • waar de data vandaan komt,
    • welke data ze hebben,
    • enz…
    • TIP: zorg dat je voldoende details opvraagt, zie GDPR art. 13 en 14.
  • (-) Dien een DAR/SAR in bij de data broker die contact data levert
  • (+/-) Stel het direct marketing bedrijf officieel in gebreke, dit is een eerste officiële klacht, los van de GDPR rechten, die vaststelt dat er een inbreuk is gepleegd. Het is wettelijk geldig om dit via mail te doen.
  • (+/-)Stel de data broker officieel in gebreke, dit is een officiële klacht, los van de GDPR rechten, die vaststelt dat er een inbreuk is gepleegd. Het is wettelijk geldig om dit via mail te doen.
  • (+/-) Leg een klacht neer bij de GBA, wanneer
    • blijkt dat ze illegaal data verzameld wordt
    • je GDPR rechten niet gerespecteerd worden

GDPR SAR/DAR + ingebreke stelling

Klacht bij KBO & FOD Eco

Hoewel de FOD Economie weinig kan doen aan het misbruik van data, hebben een aantal data brokers een licentie bij KBO. Dus het loont om misbruiken te rapporteren, zo dat ze actie kunnen nemen, waar mogelijk.

Klacht GBA

Op de website van de gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit vind deze link om een klacht in te dienen.

https://gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit.be/burger/acties/klacht-indienen

Wees voorbereid, neem voldoende tijd om dit goed aan te pakken,

  • want ze vragen dat je eerst probeert om de klacht op te lossen met de tegenpartij.
  • En ze vragen bewijs te leveren, en om je klacht goed te onderbouwen.

En besef dat een procedure met de GBA tijd neemt. Dus verwacht niet meteen resultaat op korte termijn.

Daarentegen is het wel belangrijk om klacht neer te leggen, want dat geeft ook duidelijk aan bij de GBA hoe ernstig dit probleem is, als er meerdere slachtoffers dit rapporten. Zowel binnen de sector van direct marketing, of specifiek voor een bepaald bedrijf dat de regels niet respecteert.

8. Referentie materiaal

Direct marketing en de aanbevelingen van GBA

Direct marketing en privacy: zo moet het volgens de GBA I DGDM (degroote-deman.be)

Gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit (GBA)

https://gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit.be/burger/thema-s/marketing/wat-is-direct-marketing

Note-to-self: public website/server certificate quick check.

Today my ESET Endpoint Security blocked my browser for what I know is (sorry, should be) a legitimate magazine website…

Using other browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Tor, …) on my machine, I had the same issue…

Microsoft Edge

ESET Endpoint Security is reporting

“Website certificate revoked

The certificate used by this server has been marked as untrustworthy and the connection is not safe

Try connecting again later or from a different internet connection.
Access to it has been blocked.

Tor

Using another pc or smartphone (not using ESET) … I was able to connect.

So what’s going on?

ESET protecting you…

Eset forums

When you look up the Eset message (“Website Certificate Revoked” eset), you’ll probably land on the ESET forums or knowledge base, … seems to be a pretty popular topic.
Like for example: https://forum.eset.com/topic/21531-eset-giving-website-certificate-revoked-message/

ESET knowledge base

https://support.eset.com/en/kb6258-website-certificate-is-revoked-is-displayed-when-visiting-legitimate-web-pages

ESET explains

“This warning is displayed when your ESET product detects that the security certificate for a website is revoked.

ESET cannot resolve the issue because only the owner of a domain can renew their security certificate. You cannot choose to continue to the site using the insecure certificate.”

How do you double check this information?

The ESET forums point to a very interesting and eays to use tool: SSLTest at SSLLabs.com

Open: https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/index.html

Then you can enter the URL of the website you want to visit or check…

Depending the status of the website (good…or bad), it will take a few seconds… to minutes… to scan the website and show the quality of the certificate.

In this case, it’s fairly clear why the website was blocked:

Just for your reference if you would check a website like: https://docs.microsoft.com, you’ll get A+ (that’s the other end of the scale..)

If you want to know more about the website rating, check the SSLLabs rating guide:

https://github.com/ssllabs/research/wiki/SSL-Server-Rating-Guide

The grading results in a score from A (top), (B) good, (C) average .. to (F) big fail lowest score …

So, it’s a very handy and free tool to check your website for issues.

Why are these websites not blocked by other tools or browsers?

First of all, check if you have an anti-virus or antimalware tool that checks the URL.

Because other browsers, apps or URL filters will not always check for the CRL (the certificate revocation list, containing certificates that are no longer valid…).

Or the CRL is not updated or and old CRL is cached. The ESET KB article mentioned, explains how to clear the CRL cache on your system.

Other interesting tools

The website (or mail) certificate is just one of the security indicators …
If you want to check the reputation of your URL, domain, website, mail system, DNS, … there are some more interesting tools you should have at hand, like https://mxtoolbox.com/NetworkTools.aspx.

Quite a while ago I posted an article on web and mail reputation, there is some more interesting free tools you can use to check the domain reputation.

See here: (TechNet Wiki) Hotmail/Outlook.com Solving Mass Mailing Delivery Issues

Conclusion

This situation show how easy it is to land on a website using revoked or unverified certificates…

Make sure to use a decent anti-malware and anti-virus tool. It’s worth to spend a small bit of money to protect your systems.

And if you combine it with some free tools to check the health of (your) websites and systems… you can achieve a decent level of security without spending a lot of money.

Extended mapping of CIS Controls to ISO27001 security controls

Introduction

The CIS (Center for Information Security) Controls list is a very well known list of security measures to protect your environment against cyberattacks.
The Center for Information Security provides a handy XLS sheet for download to assist in your exercise.

Here is the link: https://www.cisecurity.org/controls/cis-controls-list/

Many companies use this controls list already, but also require to map their CIS security controls to ISO27001, for various reasons.

Implementing security controls with regards to the NIS directive, is one of them, eg when you’re implementing OT…

ISO27001 controls mapping

For that purpose the CIS provided a XLS mapping between the CIS controls and ISO27001.

You can download the sheet from the CIS website: https://learn.cisecurity.org/controls-sub-controls-mapping-to-ISO-v1.1.a

Security note for the security freaks, apparently the document is hosted on the pardot(dot)com Salesforce website, which might be blocked by Adlist domain blockers as it’s used for marketing campaigns, you might need to unblock it, or use Tor browser…)

Alternatively, it’s available from the CIS Workbench community at: https://workbench.cisecurity.org/files/2329 (registration might be needed to access the download)

FYI, the previous version (2019, v1) of the mapping had quite some gaps. Therefor I’ve submitted a suggestion for an updated CIS-ISO27001 mapping.
And after review, a new version (1.1) with updates has been published on the CIS workbench.

Direct download for version 1.1 available at: https://workbench.cisecurity.org/files/2329/download/3615

Still some gaps

You’ll notice that the update (1.1) version has still some gaps. And I’ll leave to the discretion of the CIS review work group to argument these gaps.


But I’m convinced you can map the CIS controls for 100% to ISO27001, in one way or another, meaning use ALL ISO27001 controls in certain extent (sometimes a subset, equally or a superset of it, combining controls.)

But the license for use of the CIS controls mapping does not allow redistribution of modified materials…

Disclaimer (the small print)

Here’s the License from the mapping file:

Their work (quote) “is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 International Public License (the link can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode

To further clarify the Creative Commons license related to the CIS ControlsTM content, you are authorized to copy and redistribute the content as a framework for use by you, within your organization and outside of your organization for non-commercial purposes only, provided that (i) appropriate credit is given to CIS, and (ii) a link to the license is provided. Additionally, if you remix, transform or build upon the CIS Controls, you may not distribute the modified materials. Users of the CIS Controls framework are also required to refer to (http://www.cisecurity.org/controls/) when referring to the CIS Controls in order to ensure that users are employing the most up-to-date guidance. Commercial use of the CIS Controls is subject to the prior approval of CIS® (Center for Internet Security, Inc.).”

So I CANNOT distribute the XLS as modified material (Why not?).

Extending the mapping

If you still want to build an extended version of the mapping on your own, you download the 1.1 version and add these items to the list:

CIS sectionCoverageISO27001 Control
2.2=A.12.5.1
2.5=A.8.1.1
2.8small subsetA.12.5.1
2.10small supersetA.9.4.1/A.8.2
3.1small subsetA.12.6.1
3.2small subsetA.12.6.1
3.4small subsetA.12.6.1
3.5small subsetA.12.6.1
3.6small subsetA.12.6.1
4.1small supersetA.8.1.1/A.9.2.3 
6.5small subsetA.12.4.1 
6.6small subsetA.12.4.1 
6.8small subsetA.12.4.1 
7.3small subsetA.12.2.1
7.5small supersetA.8./A.13.1.1
7.6small subsetA.13.1.1
8.3small subsetA12.2.1
9.5small subsetA.13.1.1
10.2small subsetA.12.3.1
10.5=A.12.3.1
11.1small subsetA.13.1.1
11.2small subsetA.13.1.1
11.6small subsetA.13.1.1
12.1small subsetA.13.1.1
12.5small subsetA.13.1.1
12.10small subsetA.13.1.1
13.2small subsetA.11.2.5
14.7small subsetA.8.2.3
16.2small subsetA.9.3.1
16.3small subsetA.9.3.1
16.9small subsetA.9.2.1
16.10small subsetA.9.2.1
16.12A.12.4.1
16.13A.12.4.1
17.1=Clause 7.2
18.3=A.12.5.1
18.4A.12.5.1
18.7A.14.2.9
18.10small subsetA.14.2.5 
18.11small subsetA.14.2.5 
19.3small subsetA16.1.1
19.6small subsetA16.1.2
19.7small subsetA16.1.1
19.8small subsetA16.1.4
20.1small subsetA18.2.3
20.2small subsetA18.2.3
20.3small subsetA18.2.3
20.4small subsetA18.2.3
20.5small subsetA18.2.3
20.6small subsetA18.2.3
20.7small subsetA18.2.3
20.8small subsetA18.2.3

Planning for ISO Certification using CIS Controls?

When you look at it from a different angle and you would like to build a plan to certify your ISO27001 implementation, we need to turn around the mapping, and look for the gaps in the ISO27001 security controls AND CLAUSES, when doing the CIS control mapping.


And then you’ll notice the explicit difference in approach between CIS controls and ISO27001 controls.
CIS controls are focusing on technical implementation to harden your cybersecurity, while ISO27001 is a management system that needs these controls, but requires a management layer to support these technical controls. CIS controls are lacking this management layer.
If you compare both systems in a table the story gets clear:

The “red” areas require extra work to make it ISO27001 compliant.

And as always, if you have suggestions of feedback to improve this article, let me know, I’ll fix it on the fly.

A quick walk-through of the new ISO29184 – Online Privacy notices and consent

Source and download: https://www.iso.org/standard/70331.html

With the publication of the GDPR in 2016, it quickly became clear that it would massively impact the direct marketing sector, simply because direct marketing runs on personal data.

On 25 may 2018, the GDPR came into force, changing the global mindset on data protection (and privacy by extension).

Anno 2020, 2 years after the publication, many enterprises, large and small still struggle to apply the data protection regulation and best practices.

And for the direct marketing companies, this is a particular difficult topic, after 4 years.

So, maybe, the newly (june 2020) published standard can provide a practical help to implement consent management. Please remind that the GDPR is a regulation/law… not a best practice with hints and tips.

For hints & tips and practical advice on GDPR, check the EDPB (previously known as WP29) website: https://edpb.europa.eu/our-work-tools/general-guidance_en (Check the Our Work & Tools menu).

While there has been a lot of guidance, communication & education on implementing a direct marketing that is compliant with GDPR and ePrivacy/eCommunication regulation and directives.

Even, for other markets than direct marketing where managing personal data is optional (meaning, not part of core business), you can use this guide to manage privacy or data protection notices for your newsletters and website.

Side note

The ISO 29184 is strictly and only about privacy notices and consent, it’s not an in depth guide for direct marketing, but it’s an essential part of it.

If you need more information on the EU ePrivacy/eCommunications directive , see here: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/ALL/?uri=celex%3A32002L0058

ISO 29184 content walk through

Document structure

After the mandatory basic chapters (Foreword, 1. Scope), the document hints to ISO 29100 in chapter 2 (Normative References) and 3. (Terms and definitions.

Important note here is that the definition of “explicit consent” has been updated to match the GDPR requirement for unambiguous affirmative consent.

Chapter 5 contains the “general requirements and recommendations”.

A major requirement (and typical for ISO compliance like in ISO9001 and ISO27001) is that you need to document the implementation of each control in this standard.

The content is structured in 5 chapters (Level 2)

  1. Overall objective
  2. Notice
  3. Contents of notice
  4. Consent
  5. Change of conditions

To read the full details, you know what to do,…

But it’s interesting to see the technical/operations controls required in this standard

General conditions on privacy notice

  • Provide information to all interested parties about your privacy practices, including
    • the identity and registered address of the data controller, and
    • contact points where the subject (in this standard the subject is called “PII principal”)
  • Provide clear and easy to understand information
    • with regards the target audience,
    • which are usually NOT lawyers or data protection specialists),
    • taking care of the expected language of your audience
  • You must determine and document the appropriate time for providing notice
    • Remember the Art. 13 and Art 14 definitions in GDPR
    • By preference, you should notify the subject immediately before collecting PII (and/or consent)
  • You must provide notices in a appropriate way
    • by preference in more than 1 way,
    • to make sure the subject can find and consult the notices,
    • digitally and in a easy accessible method
    • also after initial contact
    • As also defined in many GDPR guidelines, the consent standard refers to a multilayer approach (avoiding to provide too much information at the same time, but provide the details when needed)
  • Make sure that the privacy notice is accessible all the time.

Notice content

  • make sure you’re absolutely clear, honest and transparent about your personal data processing
  • Define, document and describe clearly
    • the processing purpose
    • each element of the processing (remember the processing definitions defined in Art. 4 of GDPR)
    • the identification of the data controller
    • the data collection details, incl
      • methods used
      • details of data collected
      • type of collection (direct, indirect, observation, inference…)
      • timing and location of collection
    • use of data, including
      • direct use without data transformation
      • reprocessing data
      • combining, like enrichment
      • automated decision making
      • transfer of data to 3rd party
      • data retention (incl backup)
    • data subject rights
      • access request
      • authentication to provide access
      • timelines
      • any fees that apply
      • how to revoke consent
      • how to file a compliant
      • how to submit a inquiry
    • Evidence about consent provided (and changed) by the subject
    • the legal basis for processing PII/personal data
    • the risks related with the data and the plausible impact to the subject privacy

Consent management

  • Identify if whether consent is appropriate
    • Remember that there are other purposes and reasons for processing data, which usually have a more stable, more solid background, like
      • contracts
      • compliance with legal obligations and regulations
      • vital interest,
      • public interest
      • (legitimate interest, which is usually way more difficult to enforce or to convince the subject)
    • Informed and freely given consent
      • how do you guarantee that the subject is providing consent without any feeling of coercing, force, conditions, …
      • Independence from other processing or consent
        • Remember the GDPR guidelines where you CANNOT force consent as
    • Inform the subject which account this processing is related to
      • provide a clear description of the identifier (userID, mail, login, …)

ISO29184 also introduces the consent lifecycle, meaning that is it’s not sufficient to provide notice at first contact with the subject, but you also need to maintain, to update and to renew it on a regular basis, taking into account that the conditions of consent might change (or might have changed after initial consent).

The last part of the ISO 29184 are annexes with interesting user interface examples.

The perfect document set

To make the online privacy and consent management work, this ISO/IEC 29184 will not do on itself as the standard links to the following documents:

  • (FREE, EN – FR) ISO 27000: ISMS vocabulary
  • (*) ISO27001: ISMS, Information Security Management Systems
  • (*) ISO27002: Code of practice for ISO 27001)
  • ISO27701: PIMS, Privacy Information Management System, the privacy or data protection extension of ISO27001
  • (FREE, EN – FR) ISO29100: Privacy framework
  • ISO29151: Code of Practices – Privacy Framework (the ISO27002 version of ISO29100)
  • ISO29134: PIA, Privacy Impact Assessment (foundation of the DPIA in GDPR)

References

Free downloads

ISO Public documents: https://ffwd2.me/FreeISO

If not available for free download, then you’ll need to purchase the ISO standards documents from the ISO e-shop or from the national standards organisation (like NBN for Belgium, NEN for Netherlands, …)

Note-to-self: MNM van KSZ (Minimale normen – Sociale Zekerheid)

Minimale Normen / Normes Minimales van de KSZ (Kruispuntbank van de Sociale Zekerheid) gebaseerd op de ISO27001/ISO27002

“De toepassing van de minimale normen informatieveiligheid en privacy is verplicht voor instellingen van sociale zekerheid overeenkomstig artikel 2, eerste lid, 2° van de wet van 15 januari 1990 houdende oprichting en organisatie van een Kruispuntbank van de Sociale Zekerheid (KSZ). Bovendien moeten de minimale normen informatieveiligheid en privacy eveneens toegepast worden door alle organisaties die deel uitmaken van het netwerk van de sociale zekerheid overeenkomstig artikel 18 van deze wet. Tenslotte kan het sectoraal comité van de sociale zekerheid en van de gezondheid de naleving van de minimale normen informatieveiligheid en privacy ook opleggen aan andere instanties dan de hogervermelde.  ”

Bookmark:

(NL) https://www.ksz-bcss.fgov.be/nl/gegevensbescherming/informatieveiligheidsbeleid

(FR) https://www.ksz-bcss.fgov.be/fr/protection-des-donnees/politique-de-securite-de-linformation

(edit)

Opmerking: voor alle duidelijkheid, op zich zijn deze documenten geen nieuwigheid maar buiten de SZ zijn deze normen minder gekend… vandaar dat het toch nuttig is om ze bij te houden als geheugensteun en referentie. Je komt er sneller mee in contact als je denkt…

Cybersecurity voor vrijeberoepen en KMO (Webinar bij VLAIO)

Afgelopen vrijdag 21 februari, organiseerde Agentschap Innoveren & Ondernemen een praktisch webinar over Cybersecurity.

We toonden een vernieuwende aanpak die de zelfredzaamheid en veerkracht bij KMO’s inzake cybersecurity helpt vergroten.

Cybersecurity wordt beschouwd als één van de grootste bekommernissen in het huidige ondernemerschap. De veiligheid van (klanten)gegevens is een topprioriteit en een beleid hieromtrent uitwerken is noodzakelijk. Als adviseur zult u wel vaker de vraag krijgen van uw klanten over hoe ze hiermee aan de slag moeten gaan.

Hartelijk dank Melissa Gasthuys als gastvrouw en Eveline Borgermans voor de perfecte begeleiding en opname bij Agentschap Innoveren & Ondernemen

Hier de link naar de slides

De link naar de opname:

En je kan altijd nog even gaan kijken op cybervoorkmo.be voor meer tips en hints.

Useful GDPR resources (Working doc)

Certification

IAPP article: 4 GDPR-certification myths dispelled (EN)

EDPB (European Data protection Board)

GDPR docs: https://edpb.europa.eu/node/28

Guidelines 1/2018 on certification and identifying certification criteria in accordance with Articles 42 and 43 of the Regulation – version adopted after public consultation

ENISA

Interplay between standardisation and the General Data Protection Regulation: https://www.enisa.europa.eu/events/enisa-cscg-2017/presentations/kamara

Recommendations on European Data Protection Certification

 

 

Note-to-self: logging policy considerations

Few days ago I got a question from a security officer for guidance on event and system logging.

What I can recommend: a good guideline and indication is this from OWASP.
You know OWASP is THE reference for software security …. with their OWASP top 10 etc.

Check this: https://owasp.org/www-project-cheat-sheets/cheatsheets/Logging_Cheat_Sheet

Another reference from NIST see below, very handy.

These are fairly complete in terms of guideline.

What you should pay special attention to from a policy point of view is

Special accounts

  •  Sensitive accounts
    • Highly priviliged accounts
    • Admin accounts
    • Service accounts
  • Sensitive systems
    • Domain controllers
    • Application servers
  • Sensitive data
    • HR data
    • Finance data
    • Legal data

Regarding the classification of accounts, check these:

For the users you also have to think carefully about events

  • Large volume of failed logons from sensitive users, may indicate
    • Attack
    • Denial of service
    • Hacking
  • Attack on the password database, large volumes of password change attempts …
    •  Smart password ‘testers’ will stay just below the blocking limit ..
  • Successful logons from special accounts at abnormal places or times
  • Changing the rights of sensitive accounts
    • Promotion of regular users to admins or other sensitive accounts in AD or central database

CLASSIFICATION

Make sure you have a data, user and system classification policy.
Define roles and / or categories.
Which objects are “not important”, “not sensitive”, sensitive, important, critical.
The protection must be tailored to the category type.

STORAGE

In addition, you should also write a policy on saving data.
This often poses a logistical problem with disk space.

If you know that sometimes attacks are only detected after 200-300 days, you should be able to do a forensic investigation in that period.
But that does not have to be on live data, if it is in backup, that is also good.

In terms of operational data you have to decide how much should be available immediately, for immediate consultation.
For example, that can be 1 month. (if the system can save so much)

BACKUP

Ensure that a backup can be guaranteed for a year (combination of full / differential and / or incremental backups or virtual snapshots …)
This is not a fixed period, but depending on risk management this may be more or less.

IMPORTANT: Time synchronization

Also make sure that you require NTP time synchronization, so that the clocks are exactly matched to each other on all systems.
Log analysis is impossible without correct timing.

SECURITY

Ensure that logs on source systems cannot be deleted by administrators.
Ensure that the logs following are shielded from system owners;
Ideally, you are obliged to store logs centrally (for example in a SIEM system).

Secure backups

Consider managed encryption of data and backups (not ransomware or malware).

Healthy logging and healthy backups

Make sure to test backups and restores!

Check the logs and backup for malware.

LOG CENTRALIZATION

Store logs centrally with sufficient storage capacity, security and backup.

LOG MANAGEMENT

A good management process and regular inspection must become mandatory.
Ensure monitoring for special events or special trends (sudden growth or sudden decrease or disappearance of logs)

Arrange forensic surveillance / detention if a burglary or data breach may need to be reported to the government / DPA / police.

The NIST documentation below provides useful hints and tips about the type of systems, routers, switches, firewalls, servers …

LEGISLATION

Take into account legislation such as GDPR or ePrivacy or others that impose your obligations (legal, judicial, international, fed gov, …)

EXPERIENCE

View and learn from past incidents and known use cases or accidents, which give a clear hint of what protect first.

PDCA – plan-do-check-act

Require a regular review of the policy and the rules, ensure that the guidelines are updated to the requirements and changing situations.

It is difficult if you find out after the facts that your log is not working properly.

Other references

And this is also a reference (NIST)

Note-to-self: 2019 …cost of a data breach…

Many InfoSec and data protection or privacy courses reference 3 authoritative yearly reports that show interesting numbers, statistics and trends about breaches year over year.

And these are extremely useful to talk about to your management…

Interesting to know they all have been updated for 2019.

1. Verizon DBIR

(The Verizon Data breach Investigations Report, DBIR)

https://enterprise.verizon.com/resources/reports/2019-data-breach-investigations-report.pdf (click the view only option)

2. IBM-Ponemon – Cost of a data breach report 2019

https://www.ibm.com/downloads/cas/ZBZLY7KL

(You can always use the official link and give away your privacy…at https://www.ibm.com/security/data-breach)

3. IAPP-EY Annual Governance Report 2019

(IAPP members get it for free)

Hint: the IAPP link below also shows reports of previous years.

https://iapp.org/resources/article/iapp-ey-annual-governance-report-2019/

V2018 also available from the EY website: https://assets.ey.com/content/dam/ey-sites/ey-com/en_gl/topics/financial-services/ey-iapp-ey-annual-privacy-gov-report-2018.pdf