corporate security

Note-to-self: CIS Software Supply Chain security guide

CIS (Center for Internet Security) has published an interesting guide on software supply chain security.

Even if you do not build software on your own, it still is useful to to pick the relevant security measures/controls as part of your information security management to protect yourself and your enterprise.

As we all learned from the log4j issue which impacted many generally used platforms, it has become very clear that you need to look beyond the first level of control (your own)…

It’s critical to manage 2nd (your suppliers) and even third level (suppliers of suppliers)

Highlights

In high level overview, the document discusses:

  1. Source code
    • Code changes
    • Repository management
    • Contribution access
    • Third party
    • Code risks
  2. Build pipelines
    • Build environment
    • Build worker
    • Pipeline instructions
  3. Dependencies
    1. Third party packages
    2. Validate packages
  4. Artifacts
    • Verification
    • Access to artifacts
    • Package registries
    • Origin traceability
  5. Deployment
    • Deployment configuration
    • Deployment environment

Supply chain guide access (need to register on CIS)

https://workbench.cisecurity.org/files/3972 (login needed, but it’s non-commercial, limited data protection risk)

More info:

Extra references

Software impacted by Log4j, see the NCSC Github / Software inventory: https://github.com/NCSC-NL/log4shell/tree/main/software

(if necessary this post will be updated with more interesting material, when applicable)

You expect a phishing test… and then the real stuff kicks in… some quick tips to block evasion techniques

I see more and more phishing exercise fatigue kicking in at my customers…

But it’s more than ever required to be vigilant for new techniques that try to circumvent the typical URL blocking and the other protection layers you put in place.

You’re the best firewall.

What is going on?

You know, these companies that first announce a #phishing test…

which go unnoticed because they are caught by the 𝐬𝐩𝐚𝐦 𝐟𝐢𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫…

And a few weeks later you get the 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐟𝐟 𝐢𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐛𝐨𝐱 from the same company.

With ridiculous worse quality than the actual test… but still its in the inbox ready to click (DON’T!).

You assume phase 2 of the phishing test…another round, right? (you think: “yeah, right, not me.”).

Because the new mail comes with ridiculous bad quality (⚠️1) than the actual test…

Nowadays you expect smart mails from these criminals…

But still it doesn’t feel OK …you start to realize that this might the real stuff…

Checking for some more phishing indicators (⚠️)

A mail with you in bcc…. (⚠️2)

Addressed to a very strange (New-Zealand) mail address (⚠️3)

with a PDF alike icon image embedded (⚠️4)

via a google drive link (⚠️5)….

SPOILER: I crippled the link mentioned in previous screenshot to avoid any accidents…

SPOILER 2: DO NOT, EVER CLICK these links…

Still, If you can’t control your curiosity, you might peek into the link via alternative methods (see later).

The display of unrelated content, with payment instructions (⚠️6), isn’t really what you would expect.

Because if you even dare to click the links you get another link (⚠️7)… and this time the browser malware detection (Smartscreen filtering) kicks in .. at last… so I’ll stop the curiosity here…

Why is this an issue?

The main issue here is: the phishing links are pointing to well-known (like Google drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Dropbox…) for hosting malware, which usually escape or bypass the malware URL detection…

Security tips

Rule nr 1: Don’t click links in unexpected mails

Curiosity kills the cat: Please withstand the urge to click the links to satisfy your curiosity….

If you don’t expect the mail, be very cautions, don’t click the links.

Control your curiosity: test the links in isolated mode

If you can’t control your curiosity, don’t ever click the links on your main computer.

But copy the link and open it

  • in a Windows sandbox
  • virtual machines or test machine… not your production machine
  • mobile device

Use Windows Sandbox

Since Windows 10 (Pro) you can use Windows Sandbox (free), that is a virtual, isolated environment. So you can test some interesting things without damaging your production host machine.

By stopping the Sandbox, the machine forgets all settings and returns to default state, pristine.

More info: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/windows-sandbox/windows-sandbox-overview

Run a quarantined client in virtual machine

Use Microsoft Hyper-V (free) or Oracle Virtual box (free) and install a client OS in the virtual machine.
Snapshot the machine before the test, perform the test, return to snapshot to avoid any left overs of malware.

Run the link on a mobile phone

Less secure, but better than running malware on your most important machine, is running the link on a browser on your mobile device. There is lower risk of infection and less impact than loosing your primary working machine, although… be aware, there is still a small risk of infection even for smartphones…

Additional security measures

To permit some stupidity and protect against accidents, please make sure

  • to implement all the latest OS security updates, patch on a continuous basis
  • have an anti-malware and anti-virus that is updated continuously
  • keep the default OS security features enabled including local system firewall and malware detection
  • consider a paid antivirus subscription, it’s worth the money and keep it up to date every hour
  • get a mail protection against malware, tracking, phishing and ransomware (like Windows defender for 365) have regular backups (1 online and 1 offline) and test the restores
  • use cookie/tracking/advertisement blockers
  • use a DNS blackhole system to protect your network from accessing suspicious URLs (including tracking and phishing websites, advertisements, C&C Command and control malware domains, …)

You’re the best firewall

Don’t get caught.

Don’t be curious.

Suspect everything you don’t expect.

Don’t click the links.

And if you’re curious, keep it safe and secure.

Note-to-self: #DPIA for cloud – reference material (focus on #Microsoft cloud)

In interesting set of reference material, that is regularly coming back in data protection, cybersecurity and information security discussions I lately had with peers and colleagues.
May you can use it too…

Feel free to provide some feedback yourself, if you know additional pointers I should add.

You know where to find me.

Change history

2022-04-27 14:00: Added EDPB announcement to references section

Governmental DPIAs

Netherlands

2018-12-06: DPIA on Microsoft Office 2016 & 365

https://iapp.org/news/a/dutch-government-commissioned-dpia-on-microsoft-office-pro-plus/

Direct download of PDF:

2022-02-22: DPIA on Microsoft Office 365

https://www.dataguidance.com/news/netherlands-dutch-government-publishes-dpia-microsoft

Press release by Dutch Government:

2022-02-21 https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/documenten/publicaties/2022/02/21/public-dpia-teams-onedrive-sharepoint-and-azure-ad

Publication of DPIA by Dutch Government

2022-02-21 : https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/documenten/publicaties/2022/02/21/public-dpia-teams-onedrive-sharepoint-and-azure-ad

Source: Beltug news https://www.beltug.be/news/7430/Dutch_government_publishes_DPIA_and_DTIA_for_Microsoft/

2022-02: The Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security requested an analysis of US legislation in relation to the GDPR and Schrems II by GreenburgTraurig.

Switzerland

In a recent article (In French) by ICT journal, the Canton of Zurich published a

https://www.ictjournal.ch/articles/2022-04-26/comment-le-canton-de-zurich-a-estime-le-risque-de-passer-sur-le-cloud-de

Research

Researchgate

Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) for Cloud-Based Health Organizations

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/349882283_Data_Protection_Impact_Assessment_DPIA_for_Cloud-Based_Health_Organizations

Guidelines

CNIL

https://www.cnil.fr/en/tag/Privacy+Impact+Assessment+(PIA)

https://www.cnil.fr/en/guidelines-dpia

IAPP

https://iapp.org/news/a/guidance-for-a-cloud-migration-privacy-impact-assessment/

Templates

IAPP

https://iapp.org/resources/article/transfer-impact-assessment-templates/

Referring to:

IAPP Templates

Supplier references

Microsoft

Data Protection Impact Assessment for the GDPR

2021-11-17: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/compliance/regulatory/gdpr-data-protection-impact-assessments

Data Protection Impact Assessments: Guidance for Data Controllers Using Microsoft Professional Services

Part 1: Determining whether a DPIA is needed

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/compliance/regulatory/gdpr-dpia-prof-services?view=o365-worldwide#part-1–determining-whether-a-dpia-is-needed

Part 2: Contents of a DPIA

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/compliance/regulatory/gdpr-dpia-prof-services?view=o365-worldwide#part-2-contents-of-a-dpia

Download Customizable DPIA document

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=102398

(more to come, this article will be updated with additional references when necessary)

Other relevant references

EDPB (European Data Protection Board)

Launch of coordinated enforcement on use of cloud by public sector

https://edpb.europa.eu/news/news/2022/launch-coordinated-enforcement-use-cloud-public-sector_en

Note-to-self: free download of interesting guides for SME from DigitalSME.eu

Jean-Luc Allard pointed out to a #free#download of interesting guides for #SME on implementing the #informationsecurity basics we all need:

Freshly published: Essential controls for SMEs to protect user’s #privacy and data and ensure #GDPR compliance (based on new #ISO27002)
https://lnkd.in/epridtnY

Direct download of PDF: https://lnkd.in/en8rVMBY

And also: The #ISO27001 standard made easy for SMEs:
https://lnkd.in/eiaBbdmp
Direct PDF access: https://lnkd.in/eFR2yjp

And there is more on the website of European DIGITAL SME Alliance (website: https://www.digitalsme.eu/)

#smebusiness#smesupport#smallbusiness

#ICYMI, check these online fully accessible + freely downloadable ISO standards, relevant for information security, privacy & data protection

#ICYMI, In case you missed it.

Online freely accessible ISO standards

In the midst of the #COVID19 corona pandemic, the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) has unlocked free reading access to a bunch of relevant standards, including

  • ISO 22301:2019, Security and resilience – Business continuity management systems –Requirements
  • ISO 22316:2017, Security and resilience – Organizational resilience – Principles and attributes
  • ISO 22320:2018, Security and resilience – Emergency management – Guidelines for incident management
  • ISO 31000:2018, Risk management – Guidelines
  • ISO 13485:2016, Medical devices — Quality management systems – Requirements for regulatory purposes

The general access page with all online, fully accessible standards can be found here: https://www.iso.org/covid19.

Important note:

  • these standards are available online, but not downloadable (for legitimate downloads you need to purchase your copy in the ISO shop or with your national standards organisation)
  • there is no guarantee for continued free access once the Covid pandemic is over, if ever. That’s the sole discretion of the ISO, of course.

Freely downloadable ISO standards

Next to the (temporary) free online access, there is also a set of standards you can download for free, no payment required.
See here: https://standards.iso.org/ittf/PubliclyAvailableStandards/

Short url to bookmark: https://ffwd2.me/FreeISO.

Check the interesting ISO standards (from the information security point of view) below

ISO27000 (Information security)

The ISO27001 vocabulary

ISO/IEC 27000:2018
EN – FR
5thInformation technology — Security techniques — Information security management systems — Overview and vocabularyISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27

Privacy Framework (ISO29100)

ISO/IEC 29100:2011
EN – FR
1stInformation technology — Security techniques — Privacy frameworkISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27

Cloud Computing Reference architecture

SO/IEC 17788:2014
EN
1stInformation technology — Cloud computing — Overview and vocabularyISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38
ISO/IEC 17789:2014
EN
1stInformation technology — Cloud computing — Reference architectureISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38

Cloud computing vocabulary

ISO/IEC 22123-1:2021
EN
1stInformation technology — Cloud computing — Part 1: VocabularyISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38

Cloud computing policy development

ISO/IEC TR 22678:2019
EN
1stInformation technology — Cloud computing — Guidance for policy developmentISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38

Cloud Computing SLAs

ISO/IEC 19086-1:2016
EN
1stInformation technology — Cloud computing — Service level agreement (SLA) framework — Part 1: Overview and conceptsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38
ISO/IEC 19086-2:2018
EN
1stCloud computing — Service level agreement (SLA) framework — Part 2: Metric modelISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38

Common Criteria (ISO 15408)

ISO/IEC 15408-1:2009
EN – FR
3rdInformation technology — Security techniques — Evaluation criteria for IT security — Part 1: Introduction and general modelISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27
ISO/IEC 15408-2:2008
EN – FR
3rdInformation technology — Security techniques — Evaluation criteria for IT security — Part 2: Security functional componentsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27
ISO/IEC 15408-3:2008
EN – FR
3rdInformation technology — Security techniques — Evaluation criteria for IT security — Part 3: Security assurance componentsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27

Identity management

ISO/IEC 24760-1:2019
EN – FR
2ndIT Security and Privacy — A framework for identity management — Part 1: Terminology and conceptsISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27

Note-to-self: SOC2 mapping to ISO27001

Just in case you get into SOC2 and want to know how to map it to existing information security implementation, whatever it may be, GDPR, ISO27001, NIST, … check this page

https://www.aicpa.org/interestareas/frc/assuranceadvisoryservices/mappingsrelevanttothesocsuiteofservices.html

It includes:

These links have nice XLS format sheets, with a bidirectional comparison between the frameworks.

Info on SOC1/SOC2/SOC3

https://www.aicpa.org/interestareas/frc/assuranceadvisoryservices/sorhome.html

SOC and SOX?

 SOC reports refer to an audit of internal controls to ensure data security, minimal waste, and shareholder confidence; SOX relates to government-issued record keeping and financial information disclosure standards law. In other words, one is about keeping information safe, and the other is about keeping corporations in check.

https://immedis.com/blog/what-are-the-key-differences-between-soc-and-sox/

https://www.logicgate.com/blog/a-comparison-of-soc-and-sox-compliance/

Also

https://linfordco.com/blog/soc-2-security-vs-iso-27001-certification/

(braindump article, still in progress)

CCSP and CCAK, not versus: build your cloud security expertise path based on your needs.

Last week (ISC)² published a blog post on the choice between CCSP and CCAK.

You can find it here: https://www.isc2.org/articles/CCSP-versus-csa-ccak.

“What is the right certification for you?”

The main title of the (ISC)² article on CCSP vs CCAK is “CCSP Certification vs. CCAK Certificate: What Are the Distinctions?”

That’s exactly what you get. A list of technical differentiators between CCSP and CCAK, but according to (ISC)².

But if you hope to get an actual answer to what the right certification is, for you… they forget to ask …you.

What do you think would be the conclusion, if you ask that question to either one of the contestants while you compare 2 certifications? Of course each party will simply draw the conclusion that their own certification is the best choice.

To answer the most important question, the dilemma CCSP or CCAK, is simple: do you need technical or audit skills for cloud security?

The answer

In essence, the answer is simple:

  • if you need cloud audit skills, dive in to the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) and ISACA Certificate CCAK.
  • if you want to have architect level technical cloud expertise and knowledge, choose CCSP
  • if you want cloud security knowledge, in basic or advanced hands-on, there are other choices to start with (more about it below)

So, if you ask the question “what is the right certification for you”, you immediately know that there is no right answer, but there are many options.
Options for a multi level expertise roadmap in cloud security, based on your current skills and your future goals.

If you like a tough challenge: why not jump into the CCAK or CCSP, CCSP or CCAK, whatever, right away.

But if you would like to boost your chance of success… take a deep breath and better plan smartly.

And don’t start with CCSP/CCAK, but prepare your track towards CCSP/CCAK first.

First some background to plan your roadmap

Setting expectations

Just to set expectations, this article only focuses on the personal education and certification options, offered by (ISC)², ISACA and CSA. Including other education provider would lead us too far.
There are way more other (cyber)security certifications available, but we focus on the cloud security track, which limits the options…

Feel free to comment with other options for cloud security training. I’ll update the article where relevant.

CSA CCSK

The Cloud Security Alliance launched the CCSK in 2011. And as they explained here, “the CCSK was quite literally the industry’s first examination of cloud security knowledge when it was released back in 2011. “

The CCSK is an easy entry, high level introduction to Cloud Security, and it doesn’t require you to have deep technical cloud security expertise.

But it still is a nice baseline for the cloud security essential knowledge.

(ISC)² – CCSP

In short: CCSP = CISSP [by (ISC)²]+ CCSK [by CSA]

The long version is explained in the (ISC)² article comparing CCSP and CCAK.

  • CCSP = Certified Cloud Security Professional
  • You need at least five years of cumulative, paid work experience
  • CCSP is pretty much the same level of difficulty as CISSP, but has focus on cloud security.

The CCSP was launched in 2015, as a cooperation between (ISC)² and CSA. (see CSA press release here), a couple years after the CCSK launch in 2011.
The CCSP is the bigger brother of the CCSK, more advanced, and as CSA rightfully mentions in there CCSK-CCSP comparison blog, the CCSP is on the level of CISSP with a major cloud flavor.

That’s where the dummy math description comes from…

CCSP = CISSP + CCSK.

But CCSP certainly is not an entry level exam.

More information:

ISACA & CSA – CCAK

CCAK = CISA [ISACA] + CCSK [CSA]

CCAK (Certificate of Cloud Auditing Knowledge) is cohosted by ISACA and CSA.
And then you immediately know the approach is different than the approach of (ISC)².

ISACA (Previously known as the Information Systems Audit and Control Association®) stems from audit.
CSA focuses on cloud security.

That’s exactly what CCAK is about : cloud security audit.

See here:

As ISACA mentions on their product page: “The Industry’s First Global Cloud Auditing Credential”.

CISSP

For completeness, I mentioned the CISSP ( Certified Information Systems Security Professional).
I don’t think it needs a lot of explanation, it’s pretty much the reference standard for IT Systems security. (ISC)² references it as “The World’s Premier Cybersecurity Certification”.

It’s a pretty heavy exam, and it does require at least 5 years professional security experience. This is not an entry level exam.

More info: https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP

SSCP (Systems Security Certified Practitioner)

Due to the experience requirements, CISSP might be a tough credential to start with, although you can pass the exam, and continue to build your experience to grab the CISSP title…

If you want the plan your credentials the smart way, or you’re fresh in cyber-, information or IT-security, you better start with SSCP.

That the little brother of CISSP, and it’s an excellent way to step up to CISSP. More info: https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/SSCP

Where to start?

Cybersecurity & Information security essentials

As explained earlier, for tech skills in cyber-, IT and information security: look into SSCP first.

(Then step up to CISSP.)

Cloud security essentials: CCSK

Now it’s obvious what your first step in cloud security education should be: CCSK.

The CCSK is the perfect introduction to cloud security essentials.

Although it’s very helpful to have some technical IT basic knowledge, the CCSK is very accessible for general audience.

To prepare for the CCSK, you can follow classes or self-study via a completely free preparation toolkit.

Source: CSA CCSK v4 exam (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/artifacts/ccskv4-exam-prep-kit/)

You can buy a double-try access ticket for the CCSK online exam (60 questions, 90 minutes), so if you would fail the first attempt, study again and retry the exam.

Then plan your track: only technical (no interest for audit) or audit, or both

Only technical

If you focus on technical expertise in cloud security, CCSP is a reference standard (at least, on of them…) .

As mentioned: CCSP = CISSP + CCSK.

So the track is clear

  • After passing the CCSK exam,
  • Take the CISSP exam
  • then take the CCSP

This is the easier route if you already have 5yr+ experience. It’s not the cheapest route, as you pass the CISSP first, but it’s worth the effort. (you only need to pay 1 yearly fee at (ISC)², so after 1 certification, … no extra cost in yearly membership fee)
For junior, less experienced, security engineers, start with SSCP before jumping into CISSP, and then CCSP.

Audit

When you target IT security audits, you need to take a different route depending your background.
Having the CCSP/CISSP background is extremely useful to boost your career in audit.

But for the CCAK, the core audit baseline is CISA.

Keep in mind, similar to CISSP and CCSP, CISA has the same requirements regards professional experience, 5 years.

But if you’re a ISACA CISA, you can add CCSK to the track and land on the CCAK.

Both?

Then it’s obvious, first tech, then audit, meaning a smart combination of

  1. CCSK
  2. (SSCP > ) CISSP
  3. CCSP
  4. CISA (or alternative)
  5. CCAK

Alternative routes

ISO27001 Implementer & Auditor

And alternative route to the auditing experience is ISO27001 auditing, but you’ll need some implementation experience before you can audit.

CISM

Within the ISACA portfolio, the CISM (Certified Information Security Manager), covers the same areas as most ISO27001 (lead) implementer courses.

Which can be helpful to ramp up for the CISA audit part, to gain some hands-on in IT & Infosec governance.

Visualizing your cloud security education roadmap

Lots of blah for a simple choice?

Allow me to visualize the options…

The difference between “certification” and “certificate”, does it really matter?

In it’s blog post (ISC)² tries to put CCSP above CCAK by saying “CCSP is a certification; CCAK is a certificate.”

And they continue “A certification recognizes a candidate’s knowledge, skills, and abilities, typically framed by a job role, while a certificate’s scope is narrower and only documents training course completion. A certification often requires continuing professional education (CPE) to stay in front of trends, while a certificate’s body of knowledge does not evolve over time or require CPE credits to maintain.

And their explanation is at least flawed and cutting corners to benefit CCSP.

There are many explanations and interpretations of “certification”, depending the context.
But in essence, “certification” is a process and a certificate is a document (the result).

When you certify for “CCSP” at (ISC)², you need to comply with the CCSP condition and then get a document, your CCSP certificate.
Idem for CCAK, you need to comply with their conditions.

Both the certification process for CCSP as the process for the CCAK are used by other similar education providers.

Eg, PECB, ISACA, EC-COUNCIL, … and others require to pay a yearly fee, keep CPE/CPD (continous professional education or development). Some yearly fees are cheaper as others.

Like CSA, Microsoft and others ask for a 1 time exam fee, and then update the exam on longer term, not yearly, and do not require a yearly maintenance fee.

It’s a choice of the certificate owner, how the evaluation and exams are done.

Some of them comply to the ISO17024, and education standard. There are huge benefits to comply (like increased credibility, compatibility with other certifications, …). But it’s not mandatory.

(ISC)² uses an exam, with experience requirement and continuous education once you pass the exam, but you do not need to pass the exam again, unless it’s upgraded to a new build or major version.

But CSA does exactly the same, for example when CCSK was upgraded from v3 to v4, you needed to pass the exam again.

Not on a yearly basis, but the program is updated, the exam is updated… on a regular basis, without yearly fee.

It’s rather a (small) financial effort, not of significance for most companies paying the bill. (Although as an individual, the cost of certification can become a serious burden…)

And it’s certainly not relevant when choosing between CCSP and CCAK. CCAK is cheaper, as referenced in the (ISC)² comparison chart.

References

(ISC)²: CCSP Certification vs. CCAK Certificate: What Are the Distinctions?

Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)

CSA Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge (CCSK)

CSA & ISACA CCAK

CCAK learning material

CCSK vs CCSP

Vocabulary (alphabetical)

CCAK: Certificate of Cloud Auditing Knowledge (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/education/ccak/)

CCSK: Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/education/ccsk/)

CCSP: Certified Cloud Security Professional (https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CCSP)

CSA: Cloud Security Alliance (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/)

(ISC)²:  International Information System Security Certification Consortium (https://www.isc2.org/)

Note-to-self: 2020 IDG Security priorities study

Source: https://f.hubspotusercontent40.net/hubfs/1624046/2020_Security%20Priorities%20Executive%20Summary_final.pdf

End 2020 IDG published a study on Security priorities, and it provides important guidelines to the priorities of securing yourself and your company

  1. Protection of confidential and sensitive data
  2. End-user awareness
  3. Corporate resilience
  4. Enhance access control
  5. Understand external threats
  6. Application security
  7. Plan for unexpected risks

This pretty much confirms that your customers, stakeholder’s and staff interest in protecting personal data is driving security from business perspective.

If you see the increase of cyberattacks and ransomware hitting the business, it’s pretty obvious that Business Continuity Management and Disaster recovery must be on top of your priority list.
You need to have a tested plan against successful cyberattacks and ransomware, to avoid extended business damage and massive (ransom) costs … afterwards.

To put a plan together, you need to understand who is your adversary and what the current state of cybersecurity is.
And this study is a simple but smart guide to define your priorities.

The better you prepare, the less it will cost.
But you’ll only be able to tell when it goes wrong.

Don’t get caught by surprise, be ready.

Note-to-self: Crowdstrike has published their 2021 Global Threat report

Crowdstrike has published their 2021 Global Threat report.

It’s always an interesting reference to see what the world in cybersecurity is about, certainly with the turbulent pandemic year.

They look at:

  • cybersecurity during COVID19
  • cybersecurity in health care
  • significant political, state based attacks
  • evolution of ransomware

And no one has to tell you, we’ve not seen the end yet.

Hang in, get ready, protect yourself for more bad stuff to come.

Keep patching your systems, all of them, all the time.

And by the way, don’t ay with your personal data for the download. Direct download is available at:

Note-to-self: #ZeroTrust #maturity model assessment by #Microsoft

Have you ever assessed the maturity of #cybersecurity implementation?

The #ZeroTrust #maturity model assessment by #Microsoft provides you with great insights, where to start or which part of your security needs improvement.

Easy to use, easy to understand, great results and great guidance.

You can find the assessment tool here:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security/business/zero-trust/maturity-model-assessment-tool

And if you need more info, then bookmark this Zero Trust resources page: https://www.microsoft.com/security/blog/2021/05/24/resources-for-accelerating-your-zero-trust-journey