video

Using SPF to block mail account spoofing

Introduction

Did you ever got a mail from yourself, but you’re sure you did not send it?

This week I got that mail from a mail alias I’m using, so it’s actually not a native mailbox, but a mail forwarder address, which makes the claim that “the mailbox is hacked” pretty silly…

But if you got this message from a native mailbox, it does sound scary, isn’t it?

I already had some similar symptoms on other mail addresses in the same domain.

Symptoms

You get a mail from your own mail address… which is called mail spoofing.
And it looks like:

mailspoof

Spoofed mail message content

Hi!

As you may have noticed, I sent you an email from your account.
This means that I have full access to your account.

I’ve been watching you for a few months now.
The fact is that you were infected with malware through an adult site that you visited.

If you are not familiar with this, I will explain.
Trojan Virus gives me full access and control over a computer or other device.
This means that I can see everything on your screen, turn on the camera and microphone, but you do not know about it.

I also have access to all your contacts and all your correspondence.

Why your antivirus did not detect malware?
Answer: My malware uses the driver, I update its signatures every 4 hours so that your antivirus is silent.

I made a video showing how you satisfy yourself in the left half of the screen, and in the right half you see the video that you watched.
With one click of the mouse, I can send this video to all your emails and contacts on social networks.
I can also post access to all your e-mail correspondence and messengers that you use.

If you want to prevent this,
transfer the amount of $778 to my bitcoin address (if you do not know how to do this, write to Google: “Buy Bitcoin”).

My bitcoin address (BTC Wallet) is: 1GoWy5yMzh3XXBiYxLU9tKCBMgibpznGio

After receiving the payment, I will delete the video and you will never hear me again.
I give you 48 hours to pay.
I have a notice reading this letter, and the timer will work when you see this letter.

Filing a complaint somewhere does not make sense because this email cannot be tracked like my bitcoin address.
I do not make any mistakes.

If I find that you have shared this message with someone else, the video will be immediately distributed.

Best regards!

Root cause

The DNS setting of your domain is missing SPF records, that counter mail spoofing (an unauthorized mail server, user or hacker sending mail as “you”)…

Troubleshooting

When looking at the mail properties it’s pretty difficult (if not impossible) to find out who actually has sent the mail….

Solution

Basic domain settings

Add an SPF record to your domain DNS settings.

To get started, look up your mail provider or hosting provider’s name + SFP.

FYI, I’m hosting my domains at one.com, they’ve got some straight forward advise to configure the DNS. For any other domain, at any other provider it’s similar.

Office 365

When you buy a domain, but host your mail on O365, there are some additional settings to configure. But Office 365 will explain.

The easy part, logon to your O365 tenant, and check your domain health (see video below)

For more info, check these documents:

References

SPF tooling

Other security options

See also

Hotmail/Outlook.com Solving Mass Mailing Delivery Issues

Short URL: Http://aka.ms/outlook.com/help

While SPF is the first step, you should also consider DMARC and DKIM.

 

Note-to-self: Channel9 – Azure Active Directory Connect: in-place upgrade from legacy tools

Source: https://channel9.msdn.com/Series/Azure-Active-Directory-Videos-Demos/Azure-Active-Directory-Connect-in-place-upgrade-from-legacy-tools

Andreas Kjellman has published an small, but very interesting bit of video on Channel 9.
You can read more in the Azure AD Connect documentation pages00https://channel9.msdn.com/Series/Azure-Active-Directory-Videos-Demos/Azure-Active-Directory-Connect-in-place-upgrade-from-legacy-tools/player

You can read more in the Azure AD Connect documentation pages

Additionally, I strongly suggest to have a look at the discussion/comments on the post.

Having a 2nd server is now supported. This is called a “staging server” and more information can be found here: https://azure.microsoft.com/documentation/articles/active-directory-aadconnectsync-operations/#staging-mode.

It is also possible to filter based on OUs. More information on filtering options can be found here: https://azure.microsoft.com/documentation/articles/active-directory-aadconnectsync-configure-filtering/.

Note-to-self: understand and manage the risk posed by targeted attacks by determined adversaries

Source:

Bookmark this:

Microsoft has released a series of whitepapers that are designed to help organizations understand and manage the risk posed by targeted attacks by determined adversaries.  These papers include:

In addition, they have published a short series of videos that introduce many of the topics covered in these papers.

Full details at: http://blogs.microsoft.com/cybertrust/2013/06/13/targeted-attacks-video-series/

The shortcut below:

Introduction to Determined Adversaries and Targeted Attacks:

Mitigating Pass-the-Hash Attacks:

Anatomy of a Cyber-attack Part 1:

Anatomy of a Cyber-attack Part 2:

Importance of Securing Active Directory: